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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
any opinions on this?

Kit includes the following parts:
OEM timing belt made by Continental
OE tensioner Roller made by NTN-Japan
OE tensioner assembly made by NTN-Japan
OE Idler roller (comes on the tensioner assembly)
Hepu water pump with metal impeller
Conti-Tech accessory drive belt
Behr thermostat
ECS/OEM motor mount bolt kit
Camshaft seal
Crankshaft seal

http://www.ecstuning.com/stage/edpd/pag ... uctID=2286

is this better, same, worst than oem or any advantages or disadvantages etc.?
 

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As long as it's all genuine Audi stuff it should be OK but personally I think fitting new camshaft and crank seals is going a little over the top - they are usually extremely reliable - there's probably more chance of causing a leak by not fitting them properly and it's much extra work - it's a big enough job to start with! Fitting a new thermostat can be done on another occasion too - like when required :wink: . Nice to see new stretch bolts though - people often re-use the old ones and they come loose or break.

The picture seems to show a standard water pump. Wak showed a picture of a metal one that was supposed to give less flow and cause higher temperatures. Personally I've stuck to the standard one and just factor in a new one with each belt change.
 

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John-H said:
As long as it's all genuine Audi stuff it should be OK but personally I think fitting new camshaft and crank seals is going a little over the top - they are usually extremely reliable - there's probably more chance of causing a leak by not fitting them properly and it's much extra work - it's a big enough job to start with! Fitting a new thermostat can be done on another occasion too - like when required :wink: . Nice to see new stretch bolts though - people often re-use the old ones and they come loose or break.

The picture seems to show a standard water pump. Wak showed a picture of a metal one that was supposed to give less flow and cause higher temperatures. Personally I've stuck to the standard one and just factor in a new one with each belt change.
I agree with you on this John :wink:
 

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Sorry - couldn't resist.

In order of importance to actual cam belt failure which is the most catastrophic event:

1 - Cambelt
2 - Tensioner roller
3 - Idler roller (on damper)
4 - Tensioning damper
5 - Water pump
6 - Stretch bolts
7 - Aux belt

If I was doing the cam belt change job I'd replace all of the above.

If I was rating things in order of unreliability I'd shift the water pump higher up. It's very unlikely to cause cam belt failure, which is why I rated it lower, but the impellor can crack and fall off leaving you with cooling problems, requiring you to change the belt again anyway, so it's a false economy not to replace it. Cost ~£45

The tensioning damper is not recommended to be changed by Audi unless it has a problem - but again, should it fail your cam belt will thrash around and there is a risk of it jumping teeth and causing major engine damage. You may be lucky and hear it rattling before it's too late. Cost ~£75 It comes with a idler roller.

The stretch bolts are only a few quid so should be renewed no question. They won't cause cam belt tailure but your engine could drop out! Some Audi dealers don't bother renewing, which they will probably get away with on the first occasion, but how do they know how many times they've been stretched previously??? Each time they are stretched they get weaker and can snap when tightened or in service. The workshop manual says always replace.

The Aux belt won't cause cam belt failure either but you might as well replace it.

I wouldn't bother with the cam and crank seals unless you have a leak which is rare, nor the thermostat unless, again, you have a problem with temperature regulation.

Audi do a "cam belt kit" which includes Belt, Tensioning roller and idler roller. You'll need to order the water pump, tensioning damper and bolts separately. You'll end up with a spare idler roller as the damper comes with one but that's still the cheaper route through the dealer.

If you've not seen this already, here is an excellent guide for the job: http://www.amp82.co.uk/tt/timingbelt/

You may also need some coolant.
 
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