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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This isn't a regular accurate but occasionally someone will park outside our house on the pavement, the pavement is more than double the width of a normal pavement and after my house narrows to normal width, so with a car pulled right up to my boundary a car causes no obstruction, however the road does have double yellows as we're across the road from the local fire station.
My partners daughter has received a parking ticket outside the house, she was there no longer than 10 minutes and the photo the warden took clearly shows the daughter loading a child push chair into the car. The council say it's a valid ticket but I'm not sure if that is the case.
Anyone have any advice?

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2001 Amulet Red 225 coupe.Owned from new as well as a Nurburg VXR & an XR3, all from new.
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Hi, No matter how wide the pavement, parking on double yellows means pay the fine.
Hoggy. :D
 

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When I parked in a similar manner admittedly a long time ago, I was successfully prosecuted for obstruction.

At the time I did not appreciate the difference between obstruction and parking but it was pointed out to me when I started a new job that I had stated on my application that I did not have a criminal record when in actual fact I had. A conviction for parking is not a criminal offence but one for obstruction is and therefore I had a criminal record :x
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's what I thought but double yellows only relate the to road, I see parking a car on the pavement as no different to leaving my wheely bins out every Tuesday.
I've also found this ;-)

"There is a blanket ban on pavement parking in London but outside of London, it's a different story. Councils have to go down a step-by-step process to put a parking ban in place.

In February, local transport minister Norman Baker gave all councils in England permission to use signs to indicate a local pavement parking ban. Until now councils had to gain special authorisation to put a pavement parking ban in place.
 

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2001 Amulet Red 225 coupe.Owned from new as well as a Nurburg VXR & an XR3, all from new.
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Hi, If parked fully on the pavement, with no wheels on the road, then yes dispute it, but could cost more than paying the fine.
Hoggy. :D
 

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She's probably not been done for parking on double yellows but for the separate offence of obstructing a public footpath. Check the details on the ticket. It could also be for driving elsewhere than on a road. In fact there are a number of offences she's probably committed. Bottom line, the pavement is not intended for cars. Yes, there's loads of places where people (often without drives) will take advantage of broad pavements in front of their houses in order to park off the road and if the pavement is wide enough it causes no problem, but technically offences will have been committed.

Yes, it is over-zealous and unnecessary enforcement, but that is what you get when you take that responsibility out of the hands of the police and pass it to profit-motivated private companies. We're going to have to get used to it - this is what the Government plan to do with all law enforcement. However in this case check what the ticket says she's been done for. If it is for obstruction and you can show there was ample clear passage to get by the car then you may have grounds to contest it, but I suspect any success is going to have to rely on catching the appeals committee on a good day. If it is for double yellows then you'd have a much better chance; if the car isn't on the road at all you can't commit that offence.
 
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