Audi TT Forum banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Absolutly fuming!! Washed the car this morning.. and noticed a bubble on the rear quarter arch! Basically stone chips have took the paint off around the lip and it’s spread upwards .. didn’t think these would rust !! Rather than costly repair bills anyone have any ideas what to do myself first or stop the rust spreading ?? Front wings wouldn’t bother me as much as there easy replaceable but can’t have a rusty rear quarter
Tire Eye Wheel Automotive tire Tread

😩
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,887 Posts
Slowing down the spread is all you can do, remove the arch line and clean the inner lip before loading it with a cavity wax to keep the water out. bilt hamber or acf50 products are good but that area will need a repair at some point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Slowing down the spread is all you can do, remove the arch line and clean the inner lip before loading it with a cavity wax to keep the water out. bilt hamber or acf50 products are good but that area will need a repair at some point.
I’m worried to remove the inner arch lining in case I spot more mate :LOL:.. how much paint around the bubble would U chip off to treat it ?
 

·
Administrator
2001 Amulet Red 225 coupe.Owned from new as well as a Nurburg VXR & an XR3, all from new.
Joined
·
95,663 Posts
I’m worried to remove the inner arch lining in case I spot more mate :LOL:.. how much paint around the bubble would U chip off to treat it ?
Hi, You'd have to remove enough to reveal rust free metal before treating the rust. You will always know it's there but better than leaving it to spread.
Hoggy. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
Mine's a hundred times worse than that. I know that's no consolation (especially not for me) but it's just the kind of thing you often get on a 20-year-old car. I know they're supposed to be galvanised, but galvanising is only a zinc coating on the steel and it can be scraped off. You may well find this is just spreading from a couple of stonechips that weren't properly sorted when they first happened, and the rust is spreading behind the paint. Mine has nothing on the inner arch when I remove the arch liner, but I'm not sure whether it's double-skinned all the way to the edge of the arch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
It may not be too bad ,but better treat it now as it won’t cure it self . Try keeping rust at bay on a 50 year old Lancia 😬😬
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi, You'd have to remove enough to reveal rust free metal before treating the rust. You will always know it's there but better than leaving it to spread.
Hoggy. :)
Yeah agreed mate .. I’m no body shop lol but better than having it spread your right 🙏🏻
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mine's a hundred times worse than that. I know that's no consolation (especially not for me) but it's just the kind of thing you often get on a 20-year-old car. I know they're supposed to be galvanised, but galvanising is only a zinc coating on the steel and it can be scraped off. You may well find this is just spreading from a couple of stonechips that weren't properly sorted when they first happened, and the rust is spreading behind the paint. Mine has nothing on the inner arch when I remove the arch liner, but I'm not sure whether it's double-skinned all the way to the edge of the arch.
Oh wow really ? Is yours from stone chips aswel then mate ? I’ll have to take wheel off and inspect under the arch lining .. what are you going to do about yours ? :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
Oh wow really ? Is yours from stone chips aswel then mate ? I’ll have to take wheel off and inspect under the arch lining .. what are you going to do about yours ? :confused:
I don't really know what it's from - I can only assume it's from damage before I got the car, along with all the scratching on the lacquer that seems to come and go.

Automotive parking light Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive lighting


I'm not exactly sure what to do about it. I did scrape it back one, stick some rust killer on and then paint it up, but you can see how well that's worked. It was done in a bit of a rush, to be fair, while I had the classic out for a weekend show. I did talk to one of the breakers about cutting an arch lip of one of his shells before they go for crushing, but I haven't done anything about it. I'm not sure I want to get into that level of bodywork restoration, so maybe this year I'll scrape it back again and have another go, perhaps take a bit more time with it. I do at least have a painter locally who tells me he can blend the paint in properly - the above is just with a BMW silver aerosol, and while you can't see it in the photo, it's not a great blend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't really know what it's from - I can only assume it's from damage before I got the car, along with all the scratching on the lacquer that seems to come and go.

View attachment 480657

I'm not exactly sure what to do about it. I did scrape it back one, stick some rust killer on and then paint it up, but you can see how well that's worked. It was done in a bit of a rush, to be fair, while I had the classic out for a weekend show. I did talk to one of the breakers about cutting an arch lip of one of his shells before they go for crushing, but I haven't done anything about it. I'm not sure I want to get into that level of bodywork restoration, so maybe this year I'll scrape it back again and have another go, perhaps take a bit more time with it. I do at least have a painter locally who tells me he can blend the paint in properly - the above is just with a BMW silver aerosol, and while you can't see it in the photo, it's not a great blend.
That’s what mines Gonna look like a think too buddy .. I don’t have the kinda money for a body shop so guess I’ll have a crack my self with some P38 … what rust killa did u use ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
I can't remember. I'm intending next time to use Hydrate 80 as I've heard that recommended in a few places, and am using it on the current restoration project. I don't think I used that last time as I didn't have it back then, so it might have been something like Jenolite. The H-80 is a two-step application - put it on, leave for 30 minutes, then put another coat on and leave for 24 hours, and I didn't have that much time last time.

Another option if I have the time is to use proper phosphoric acid and rather than ending up with a black "treated" surface, I'd end up with a clean metal surface. Trouble is, that takes a lot longer as you need to keep applying it, cleaning it off and re-applying it. And the ideal time to do this is in summer (when I don't mind driving the classics around as there's no salt on the road) but then I want the TT on the road in summer as it's a roadster.

I'm not sure using a body shop for the actual rust repair would be worth the money. They're either going to insist on cutting out and welding a new piece in - which is really the only proper way to fix it - or they're going to clean back, rust kill and fill over it, which I can do myself. As my rust is starting to edge over from the flat outer arch panel, though, it makes the painting quite a bit more complex, so I may have someone else do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I can't remember. I'm intending next time to use Hydrate 80 as I've heard that recommended in a few places, and am using it on the current restoration project. I don't think I used that last time as I didn't have it back then, so it might have been something like Jenolite. The H-80 is a two-step application - put it on, leave for 30 minutes, then put another coat on and leave for 24 hours, and I didn't have that much time last time.

Another option if I have the time is to use proper phosphoric acid and rather than ending up with a black "treated" surface, I'd end up with a clean metal surface. Trouble is, that takes a lot longer as you need to keep applying it, cleaning it off and re-applying it. And the ideal time to do this is in summer (when I don't mind driving the classics around as there's no salt on the road) but then I want the TT on the road in summer as it's a roadster.

I'm not sure using a body shop for the actual rust repair would be worth the money. They're either going to insist on cutting out and welding a new piece in - which is really the only proper way to fix it - or they're going to clean back, rust kill and fill over it, which I can do myself. As my rust is starting to edge over from the flat outer arch panel, though, it makes the painting quite a bit more complex, so I may have someone else do that.
Mate your a star thanks for that detailed reply I think your right a body shop is gonna be well pricy if there cutting out panels .. I think we should just have a crack ourselfs for now .. I will get some hydrate 80 and some went dry sand paper bit of filler and give it a go 😄
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
Is it a big job to fit new quarter panel? Cut out the arch weld new 1 in?
If fitting the whole quarter panel that would be a pretty big job, I would think, certainly far more than the value of the car. Just replacing the arch wouldn't be so bad, but I still don't fancy doing it*, and I even less fancy paying someone else to do it. And, of course, I don't know how easy it is to get a new panel, and the breakers may be just as bad.

* For context, this is the back end of my current project. Replacing panels doesn't worry me too much, but there's still something putting me off doing it to the TT - not least that the project below has been ongoing for many months and it doesn't matter if it takes a lot more months to get it done.

Wheel Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Car Vehicle
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top